September’s Best Kitchen Flooring Options – Forbes Home

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Renovating a kitchen can be a complicated process. Unlike a bedroom or living room with few built-in components or complicated wiring outside of a TV or computer, kitchens have a lot of considerations; appliances, plumbing, and electrical all need to be in place to make the most of the space and ensure it operates safely.

When considering a kitchen remodel, don’t forget about your flooring. Flooring should make up about 7% of the renovation budget if you’re tackling the whole kitchen. It also needs to be done earlier in the process; painting your kitchen walls may come first, but flooring and cabinetry should come before counters, backsplashes and appliances. While you can DIY some of these, it’s always a good idea to hire a professional flooring installation company to make sure the job is done perfectly. The pros and cons of some of the most common and best flooring options for kitchens are listed below.

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1. Hardwood

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One of the more traditional options, hardwood is still a popular choice for kitchen floors today. Although not waterproof, solid hardwoods with the right finish are water resistant. Spills should be cleaned up immediately to avoid damage.

Hardwood floors can be refinished to revamp their appearance, which can be especially useful if you’re doing a small kitchen remodel and don’t want to remodel the entire floor to match the new aesthetic. Like tile flooring, hardwood can be laid in different patterns for added interest. Lately, reclaimed, recycled and environmentally friendly hardwood has been of particular interest.

Advantages

  • Many colors and patterns available
  • Easy to update

The inconvenients

  • Not waterproof
  • Can be a slippery surface

2. Tile

Kitchen Floor Tiles

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Tile is a go-to option for areas that are frequently exposed to water, like kitchens and bathrooms. Ceramic, porcelain, and stone tiles are all common choices for kitchen flooring. Tiles are available in many sizes and colors and can be arranged in a variety of patterns to suit almost any design theme.

Tiles are incredibly durable, but in some cases the grout needs to be resealed to keep it stain resistant. A do-it-yourself approach is not recommended when installing tile flooring.

Ceramic and porcelain tiles are similar; ceramic tiles are even more durable than porcelain. Both are highly resistant to damage, although due to their hardness, dishes dropped on them are likely to break, and due to their weight they are not recommended for a second-tier tier. Porcelain, in particular, is waterproof and easy to clean, but tiles can be slippery and grout is prone to staining, so any messes should always be cleaned up immediately.

Stone tiles are more expensive and also require more maintenance than ceramic or porcelain. With the proper care, it can be as durable as other types of tile, and it’s also more likely to be slip-resistant due to its porous surface. Stone tiles used in flooring include travertine, marble, slate, and granite.

Advantages

  • Many colors and patterns available
  • Very resistant
  • Raincoat

The inconvenients

  • Can be a slippery surface
  • Requires a bit of maintenance
  • Must be installed by a professional

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3. Vinyl

Vinyl kitchen flooring

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Vinyl flooring has seen a resurgence in recent years due to the modern improvements it has received. Engineered vinyl flooring now comes in tiles and planks that mimic the look of hardwood and stone. It’s completely waterproof, has an almost springy feel underfoot, is incredibly easy to clean, and is one of the best kitchen flooring options if you want to go the DIY route.

The biggest downside to vinyl flooring is that it’s softer than other options. Large appliances can dent or scratch it, so be careful when moving or upgrading things in the kitchen.

Advantages

  • Can imitate more expensive material
  • Raincoat
  • Can be installed without a professional

The inconvenients

  • Not as strong as tile
  • May be dented or scratched

4. Laminate

Laminate kitchen floor

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Laminate has long been a cheaper alternative to parquet. Like vinyl, it can mimic the look of hardwood for less; unlike vinyl, it is not always waterproof, but waterproof versions are now also available. Also, like vinyl, laminate flooring is a great option for DIY installation because the planks can be attached to each other and glued or “floated”, allowing them to be laid on a sub. -uneven floor.

Advantages

  • Can imitate more expensive material
  • Can be waterproof if a certain type is used
  • Can be installed without a professional

The inconvenients

  • Not as durable as other options
  • Some types are not waterproof

5. Cork

Cork kitchen floor

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Cork is a relatively new addition to the kitchen flooring market, and it’s another budget-friendly DIY option. Cork flooring can be purchased as a peel and stick, glue or click assembly to look like tiles or planks. Unlike many other flooring options, cork won’t feel cold to the touch and it has a soft, even springy feel, making it a good option for absorbing sound.

Made from ground cork combined with resins, cork flooring is available in a variety of shades of gray and brown. It is stain resistant but not waterproof; spills must be cleaned up before they can seep in. However, if stained, cork flooring can be sanded and then touched up with stain and sealer.

The floor can be dented by heavy appliances, but it has the ability to bounce back over time. It can also fade in direct sunlight, so it is recommended to close the curtains during the brightest hours of the day.

Advantages

  • Cheap
  • DIY
  • Absorb sound

The inconvenients

  • Can receive device withdrawals
  • fades in the sun

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6. Concrete

Concrete kitchen floor

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Concrete flooring may seem too hard for an intimate area of ​​the house, but it’s actually a very durable option for the kitchen. Stained concrete can be made to look like wood, stone or even tile, and it can be sealed to be almost completely waterproof, although mats are still recommended near areas of excessive moisture, such as in front of the sink or the dishwasher.

One of the biggest advantages of concrete is its price; it’s a much cheaper flooring option, and since it can be made to look like something else, it doesn’t have to look cheap.

Advantages

The inconvenients

  • Not as classic as other options
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